Currently Browsing: Social Web

WSG comments on that Congressman Weiner Twitter thing you’ve heard so much about.

There’s no such thing as privacy on social networks and web applications; there are only degrees of sharing. You can intend to share with only one person or intend to share with millions. He wrote “@username ” instead of “D @username ” and the rest is history. But what’s the difference between these two extremes of sharing? In the case of NY Congressman Andrew Weiner, it appears the difference was as slight as a keystroke, but is that really the case?

Weiner’s mistake was sending a public message when he wanted to sent a private message, but how much protection would that really have provided? What if he had succeeded in sending his lewd photo as a private missive and the recipient had turned around and posted it to Twitter, Facebook, Digg, their blog, anywhere? The point here is that once you’ve sent it, private or public, you have surrendered control of the content. And if you’ve sent it from an account which is unquestionably yours, you can’t claim it wasn’t you. You can claim someone hacked your account, but that’s not a smart move unless you can prove it. Weiner tried to say he was hacked. Tried, and failed.

So, to summarize the take away:

1. Most private case: Send a piece of content to a friend or trusted recipient and only your friend reads it.
2. Least private case: Sent a piece of content to everyone who’s looking, whether you’re aware they’re looking or not.

In case 1, when anyone can pretend to be someone they’re not, your internet trolling might end with you sending sensitive information to the wroooooong person. Then case 1 turns into case 2, and your boat is sunk.

There is no such thing as privacy on social networks. Just degrees of sharing. Be. Careful.

WSG comments for WNYT TV 13 on the Kegs and Eggs scandal

The Power of You Tube

Wondering about the power of You Tube? Try this on for size.

Embedded here is an unremarkable video I posted to You Tube last weekend. I mostly wanted to see how well my new Android phone would do with the direct capture and upload to You Tube, and it performed pretty well.

The back story is that I live in Albany, NY – as you already know – and we’re getting hammered with snow and cold temperatures this winter – as you already know. The snow and ice is building up on everyone’s roofs, and we’re all trying to keep our houses from collapsing or flooding with melted snow. It is really fun. Who needs summer.  Here’s the video:

As of this posting, the video has over 500 views (Updated: 642 views on 2/8/11), not a huge number of views, but it was enough for Google to invite me to join their ad revenue sharing program.

So why does this matter, you ask?

1. This video was easy to make and easy to upload and was seen by far more people than read the average post on this blog.

2. The content was timely, relevant, and easy to digest. Note the comments. People are invested in this topic, and have something to share.

If I were a business specializing in home maintenance in a cold climate, do you think using You Tube videos would be a good way to market my business? What if i had simple intro and outro graphics on the video with my business name, phone number and web address? And how much did this cost me?

There’s your answer.

The ICanHazCheezburger.com guy makes HOW much money?!?

Before you click through to this story on the business success of ICanHazCheezburger.com founder Ben Huh, try and guess the amount of money the guy makes and how many sites are a part of his Cheezburger Network.  I can haz some moneys, Mr. Huh?

What is the point of this video from the Saratoga Economic Development Corporation?

The Saratoga Economic Development Corporation debuted this video today at an event with the Saratoga County Chamber of Commerce.  I was not at the event.

I don’t mean to be critical, but I’m going to be critical.

What is the point of this video?  I’m serious.  Watch it and let me know.  Is there new information?  Is there a call to action?  Is there really a compelling case made for anything?  The only URL included in the video is to SaratogaEDC.com, which – quite frankly – is a static site lacking personalization, and appears to have been designed in 2002.

There is so much potential for organizations and businesses to tell their stories on the web.  Video, photos, interesting content, social conversations held in the open.  Putting bland, irrelevant content out there is a flat.  Waste.  Of. Time.

Twitter Loses the Super Bowl

FAIL —> What did you see if you hopped on Twitter as the Super Bowl came to a close tonight?

twitter is over capacity

My guess is that Twitter’s popularity has far surpassed the annoyance of their frequent outages.  Users likely just put up with the issues as Twitter is still a free service and the outages don’t last for too long.  I can’t help but think that these intermittent issues are what keeps Twitter from launching premium services for users and businesses.  If the service remains mostly free, users don’t bark too loud when things go sour for a bit.  A paid customer is not likely to be as patient.  Either way, I really wonder how most users react to these problems, and what percentage of possible users just decide not to bother with something they view as unreliable.

What do you think?  Do periodic outages impact the way you select your preferred social network?

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